PHOENIX (AP) — The Arizona Supreme Court rejected Monday an effort to disqualify three Republican lawmakers from this year's ballot because of their alleged roles in planning or attending the rally that led to the unprecedented attack on Congress on Jan. 6, 2021.

The ruling means U.S. Reps. Paul Gosar and Andy Biggs and state Rep. Mark Finchem remain on the primary ballot. Gosar and Biggs are seeking reelection and Finchem is running to try to become Secretary of State, Arizona’s chief election officer.

The lawsuits filed on behalf of a handful of Arizona voters alleged that Gosar, Biggs and Finchem cannot hold office because they participated in an insurrection. The lawsuits cited a section of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution enacted after the Civil War known as the “disqualification clause.”

The justices ruled that alleged violations of the disqualification clause are not grounds for challenging candidates' eligibility for office under Arizona law. The decision upholds a ruling by the Maricopa County Superior Court.

None of the lawmakers are accused of participating in the actual attack on Congress that was aimed at halting certification of President Joe Biden’s win over former President Donald Trump.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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